alkalinity

The importance of hoarding

Two different medias in this picture

After making myself (literally) do all my water testing today on both systems, I'm quickly reminded why I prefer to only run one reef at a time. Those people that run multiple tanks or frag systems deserve heavy praise for being able to keep so many separate systems thriving. I noticed some bits of corals turning white in my reef, but I kept blaming it on shade rather than a water quality issue. Today, I ran through all the Elos test kits, twice since I have to measure the 400g reef as well as the 60g frag system.

Video: Alkalinity Monitor

This interview was done at MACNA last weekend. Jim Welsh's newly built invention is the Alkalinity Monitor. It will measure tank water as frequently as you desire, and that data can be acted upon by your controller. It could send you texts & emails if the reading is out of range, and you can see what the latest measurement is just by glancing at the display on the device, or by computer or smartphone. It could trigger or stop a doser if needed. He explains it quite well, and I gotta say I'm really impressed.

 

It's Friday Night!

While most would get excited to go out on a Friday night, I instead stayed in and tinkered with my reefs.  Reefkeeping needs attentiveness, and tonight was one of those nights where I needed to address specific needs, or lose corals.  

Last time I tested the water in the frag system, Calcium was much too high, Magnesium wasn't where I wanted it, and Alkalinity was low. My dosing container had a bunch of white snow in the calcium section which didn't completely dissolve. Once Mg ran out, and Ca was nearly empty, I just had to wait for the alkalinity to be used up. The last couple of days, a couple of frags went south but I didn't put two and two together. All the alkalinity was gone.

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